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"My humanity is not debatable therefore I need not to reason with the opinions of racist, misogynist, or an homophobic character. Your mind has already been set to look down upon me and any most cases hate me. Your “opinion” doesn’t hold weight when it’s blatantly rooted in someone’s degradation."

— (via trixstra)

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militantweasel:

We at Black Autonomy Federation recognize climate change is real! However, we do not care how many photo-ops folks took with Leonardo Dicaprio, are the other actors and entertainers at the highly funded climate change March in New York. To us it is about the poor, dispossessed and working class People that matter, and building a movement to confront and defeat capitalism, police-murder, mass-incarceration, internal racism, and both the state and imperialist-colonialism. [As well as the entire white power structure] We have no use for “Champagne revolutionaries”, are the Non-profit industrial complex pacification agenda-agents. 
Source

militantweasel:

We at Black Autonomy Federation recognize climate change is real! However, we do not care how many photo-ops folks took with Leonardo Dicaprio, are the other actors and entertainers at the highly funded climate change March in New York. To us it is about the poor, dispossessed and working class People that matter, and building a movement to confront and defeat capitalism, police-murder, mass-incarceration, internal racism, and both the state and imperialist-colonialism. [As well as the entire white power structure] We have no use for “Champagne revolutionaries”, are the Non-profit industrial complex pacification agenda-agents.

Source

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thedrunkenenigma:

macsceneshawe:

ADVENTURE TIME AINT NO DAMN JOKE, SON.

At all

(Source: sandandglass, via lennymoo)

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ex0skeletal:

(via don kenn gallery)
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humansofnewyork:

"We’d get advanced warning when the American B-52’s were going to bomb the enemy positions. These were the most frightening times of the war. We’d stuff cotton in our ears and our nose and shut our eyes tight and crouch down against the ground. The bombs didn’t drop in one place. They spread out like sand. And if you weren’t ready for them and happened to be standing up with your ears uncovered and your eyes open, the pressure alone could burst your heart or break a vessel in your brain. When they dropped their bombs, I don’t think those pilots knew what it was like on the ground."
(Ho Chi Minh City \ Saigon, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"We’d get advanced warning when the American B-52’s were going to bomb the enemy positions. These were the most frightening times of the war. We’d stuff cotton in our ears and our nose and shut our eyes tight and crouch down against the ground. The bombs didn’t drop in one place. They spread out like sand. And if you weren’t ready for them and happened to be standing up with your ears uncovered and your eyes open, the pressure alone could burst your heart or break a vessel in your brain. When they dropped their bombs, I don’t think those pilots knew what it was like on the ground."

(Ho Chi Minh City \ Saigon, Vietnam)

(via freexcitizen)

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"I have noticed that when all the lights are on, people tend to talk about what they are doing – their outer lives. Sitting round in candlelight or firelight, people start to talk about how they are feeling – their inner lives. They speak subjectively, they argue less, there are longer pauses. To sit alone without any electric light is curiously creative. I have my best ideas at dawn or at nightfall, but not if I switch on the lights – then I start thinking about projects, deadlines, demands, and the shadows and shapes of the house become objects, not suggestions, things that need to done, not a background to thought."

— Jeanette Winterson (via psych-facts)

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"Too many people feel empty or sad. We turn to alcohol or distractions to help us escape reality. Instead of wasting what limited time we have on this earth, we should not distract ourselves for too long otherwise we miss the beauty that surrounds us."

— disappearedsoul.tumblr.com (via psych-facts)

(via leejax)

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thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

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thinksquad:

While a national debate roils about professional athletes whacking kids, it seems useful to remember that 19 states still allow children to be hit in public school, sometimes to the point of bruising. A federal data analysis found that on average, one child is hit in public school every 30 seconds somewhere in the United States.

While 31 states have now banned corporal punishment, these states still allow it: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wyoming. In many places, parental permission is required — and often given. It is more prevalent in Texas; least prevalent in Wyoming. The last state to abolish it was New Mexico, in 2011.

The practice persists because some educators and parents believe it helps modify disruptive behavior despite no conclusive evidence that it actually does. Some students are hit for severe infractions of school rules, and others for minor ones, like being tardy.

How many kids get hit? According to an analysis of federal data from 2009-2010, the Children’s Defense Fund reported in 2014 that 838 children were hit on average each day in public school, based on a 180-day school year, which would be 150,840 instances of corporal punishment a year — less than just a few years earlier but still a rather stunning number. African-American students and students with disabilities are disproportionately subject to corporal punishment in school, data shows.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/09/18/19-states-still-allow-corporal-punishment-in-school/

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My autobiography:

Drugs, booze, shitty tunes.
Lying awake, thinking of you.